What’s Mine is Yours giveaway! Enter to win today!

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<p>WHAT’S MINE IS YOURS from rachel botsman on Vimeo.</p>

Airbnb is featured in the soon to be released book What’s Mine Is Yours: The Rise of Collaborative Consumption by Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers. We’ve decided to give away a pre-release copy to our community!

We are excited about the launch of What’s Mine Is Yours: The Rise of Collaborative Consumption and we’re proud to be pioneers of the Collaborative Consumption movement. We have partnered with Collaborative Consumption to give our members the chance to win a copy of this book. Simply tell us what you love about Airbnb in the comment field below and you could win a copy of What’s Mine Is Yours: The Rise of Collaborative Consumption.

 What’s Mine Is Yours is a timely and idea-fueled book that reveals a powerful socioeconomic groundswell called “Collaborative Consumption” — traditional sharing, bartering, lending, trading, renting, gifting, and swapping redefined through technology and peer communities — that is transforming business, consumerism, and the way we live.
 
 From morning commutes to the way we borrow and lend money, to the way fashion is designed, to how we share our back gardens, different areas of our lives are being created and consumed in collaborative ways. We have literally re-wired our world to share — be it in an office, a neighborhood, an apartment building, a school, or a Facebook network. And this sharing is happening in ways and at a scale never before possible, creating a culture and an economy of what’s mine, is yours.

 

 

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  1. Rachel Morris

    I love how I get to enter a new world when I stay at an AirBnB property. Where I stay tells me something about where I am – it’s personal. And oftentimes, the people who are renting to me give such valuable advice about the area and culture. It’s like the difference between canned fruit and fruit off the tree. And I like fresh fruit.

  2. Ezgi

    I love the idea of uniqueness. You can find thousands of similar looking hotels/hostels but it is hard to find a Zen house in Los Gatos mountains. Same for hosts. You will have a little conversation with receptionists, but when I stay with airbnb, I feel more social and connected.

  3. Kay Johnson

    What’s mine is yours . . . . as a renter/owner the title is a very accurate reflexion of that which we offer. We are delighted to invite, & receive, new visitors to our ancient village who will participate, with it’s intriguing past, amazingly traditional way of life, and it’s pleasant, friendly environment.Collaborative consumption ? At appropriate times of year, you can – gather almonds, pick prickly pear, figs, & grapes, eat good, fresh produce including meat, fish & cheese, help with village maintenance, learn local crafts, take the mule to water, feed the cats AND walk the dog, followed by a glass of local wine, and a game of boule or dominos. Getting tired ? Race you to The Ruined Village ! No, not THAT one – the OTHER one ! First back does the washing-up !T’luego, pront ??Regs. Kay J

  4. vaalea

    Well, having only recently learned of Airbnb, I haven’t had the opportunity of first hand experience yet. Like many other Airbnbers I’m sure, I have had experience with CouchSurfing which has been a wonderful way to meet new people, and so very helpful in getting good visiting tips for the city. It is a very sociable experience; living within the local community than in an isolating hotel room. Airbnb, while offering such a WIDE range of accommodation (and I hope they do not get run over by boring hotel listings.. the website says "Listings include… bed and breakfasts, boutique hotels, …and many other traditional and non-traditional accommodations." so I’m not sure what would stop that from happening), also allows those with only a couch or airbed etc to also rent out their space which allows almost anyone to be an economical host in their city. Having experienced CouchSurfing, with many of the same benefits as Airbnb, I can say that Airbnb offers one further advantage… one can AFFORD to be a better host when there is some monetary compensation. While we have had wonderful guests stay with us, I was at times too busy working and couldn’t afford to be the best host. We ourselves are very hesitant of inconveniencing any CouchSurfing hosts, or not being able to expect recently cleaned accommodations, because we would be relying completely on our host’s generous hospitality. When there is some money exchanged, so too there can be some expectations without feeling inconveniencing, and there is more security as well within the Airbnb payment system.I compare Airbnb to CouchSurfing in my review because as far as Collaborative Consumption goes, I think those two are the biggest players… Airbnb encourages individual entrepreneurism which is certainly the better way of the future. There is something good about giving things away/sharing for free, but absolutely nothing wrong with making a few honest bucks either! :)To continue I risk simply repeating what everyone else has already said; the most unique, exciting and economical accommodation options out there.I’m excited to read What’s Mine is Yours to learn more about this fascinating shift we are seeing these days… propelled by the convenience of technology-social networking!

  5. vaalea

    Correction:***as far as Collaborative Consumption goes, I think those two are the biggest players in travel accommodations… :)

  6. richard

    I love how I get to enter a new world when I stay at an AirBnB property. Where I stay tells me something about where I am – it’s personal. And oftentimes, the people who are renting to me give such valuable advice about the area and culture. It’s like the difference between canned fruit and fruit off the tree. And I like fresh fruit.